BIG SKY

MOUNTAIN PRODUCTS

Big Sky Mountain Products pineapple logo

skiskinsonline.com by

backcountry ski and splitboard EQUIPMENT

1600

BACKCOUNTRY  TIPS

The following are a number of online resources we've put together to help you learn more about backcountry travel.

skinning techniques

Climbing Basics

Here are some tips to make your tour more fun and less work. Everything from how to set your heel lifters to how to make efficient kick turns. Good climbing technique also makes life easier for those behind.

USING HEEL LIFTERS

When and how to use your heel lifters.

the rest step

Conserving energy on the hike up.

KICK TURN BASICS  1

Setting an efficient kick turn.

KICK TURN BASICS  2

Skin track with rounded or AVA turns.

KICK TURN BASICS  3

Kick turn facing downhill.

Skin Transitions

Efficient transitions between climbing and riding has many benefits including a more relaxing day not having to hold up your friends, more time to think about the run and avalanche issues, and more time to just enjoy being out there.

TRANSITIONS 1

Anticipation, Organization, and Simplification

TRANSITIONS 2

American Mountain Guide Association tips on ski touring transitions.

Advanced Skinning

Here is a selection of advanced or specialty techniques that will make for a better tour for you and your group, or make difficult terrain less challenging.

IMPROVING SKIN TRACK

How to improve a skin track on steep or icy terrain.

USING SKI CRAMPONS

How to install and use ski crampons.

Split-Boarding

Splitboards give riders access to the backcountry just like skiers. The set up is pretty simple but here's some videos to get you started.

why slpitboard

This pretty much explains how far we've come.......CLASSIC!

putting skins on and off

Neil McNab UIAGM Splitboard Guide shows put skins on and off.

SPLITBOARD KICK TURNS

Neil McNab UIAGM Splitboard Guide demonstrates kick turn technique.

SkiMo Racing

Ski Mountaineering racing, or SkiMo, is one of the fastest growing segments of the sport. Using the lightest gear the athletes get up and down FAST!

SkiMO Race Basics

This video gives an overview of the basic gear and SKIMO techniques.

jACKSON HOLE RACE

Highlights from SkiMo at Jackson Hole.

Mondolè Ski Alp 2016

Highlights from this ISMF Ski Mountaineering World Cup race.

PIERRA MENTA 2016

Highlights from one of the world's biggest ski mountaineering race.

avalanche safety

Backcountry skiing or split-boarding is your gateway into a whole new adventure and sporting experience. You will now have access to untracked skiing and terrain that is almost unheard of in resort skiing. With this comes a responsibility to yourself, your family, your touring buddies, and the the rescue community to do things right.

 

Wow, that sounds kinda intimidating huh? Well it need not be. If you take the time to learn the skills to tour efficiently and safely you can look forward to a lifetime of fun and adventure. Is it completely safe? No, but there are hundreds of thousands of backcountry trips conducted every year and only an extremely small percentage result in mishap. Most of those mishaps are preventable. But any mishap can be serious and you will want to learn how to avoid them. So our advice is:

  • Learn to use your local avalanche advisory
  • Travel with experienced tourers
  • Keep your terrain selection in line with your forecasting ability
  • Be aware of where your critical decision points are
  • Make decisions based on actual conditions, not what you want them to be
  • BE PATIENT, the mountains aren't going anywhere !

Know Before You Go

This international avalanche awareness program provides easy to understand basic information about how to get into and safely use the backcountry. Hosted by pro athletes and avalanche professionals, this is a must see.

A must see for all backcountry users!

Backcountry Basics

Be respectful of the backcountry, but don't be intimidated. Here is a selection of backcountry basics that will help you get started. Remember, these videos do not replace taking an avalanche course.

tnf BACKCOUNTRY BASICS

A backcountry safety overview from the Teton Gravity Research Team.

FIVE RED FLAGS

Pro snowboarder Jeremy Jones on the Five Red Flags of the backcountry.

The Right Gear

Expect the best, plan for the worst is a good plan for backcountry skiing and snowboarding. Bringing the right gear can help you stay out of trouble, or respond better if something goes wrong.  Remember, these videos do not replace taking an avalanche course.

 

bca - get the gear

BCA follows the Know Before You Go protocol of getting the right gear.

air bag review

The EPIC TV team reviews some avalanche airbag technology.

Trip Planning

Planning ahead for your ski or split-board tour allows you to consider all the factors that make for a safe successful day.  Remember, these videos do not replace taking an avalanche course.

planning & preparation

The EPIC TV team explains the gear and planning for a backcountry day.

BCA Trip Planning

BCA provides a great A-Z description of how to plan your backcountry tour.

Avalanche Rescue

Knowing how to do a simple single victim rescue is sorta the key to the clubhouse. PRACTICE frequently throughout your touring career. Remember, these videos do not replace taking an avalanche course.

avalanche beacon check

American Mountain Guide Association daily beacon check routine.

bca - Beacon Search

Details on an avalanche Signal Search, Coarse Search, and Fine Search.

BCA - PINPOINT PROBING

Companion rescue and probe-line techniques are reviewed.

BCA - STRATEGIC SHOVELING

This reviews the most effective methods of digging out a victim.

Snow Pits

Snowpits are a great way of gathering more information on the snowpack.  While snowpits provide great information, it does take training and experience to know how to evaluate them. We recommend taking and avalanche course from a reputable school.

 

SNOWPIT BASICS

Basics on where and how to dig a snowpit.

SNOWPACK ANALYSIS

Snowpack analysis with Sarah Carpenter of AAI.

WHERE TO DIG A SNOWPIT

Some tips on where to dig your snowpits.

Lessons Learned

Sometimes mother nature is our best teacher. These videos are intended for us to learn from, not scare us away from the backcountry. Every avalanche incident in the mountains reveals important lessons we can all learns from. That said, you still need formal training so we recommend taking and avalanche course from a reputable school.

 

Travis Rice has a close call

Snowboard legend and The Fourth Phase crew slightly  underestimate the probability and consequence of an avalanche while filming in Valdez Alaska.

Xavier's miraculous survival

Xavier De La Rue, one of the worlds best and most experienced snowboarders survives at massive avalanche. Surviving an avalanche of this size is EXTREMELY lucky.

FIVE RED FLAGS OF THE BACKCOUNTRY:

These rules of thumb provide you with indicators of snow-pack instability or increased avalanche hazard. Whenever you see one, or many, of the signs you need to take care to adjust your travel plans to account for this danger. Sometimes that means picking a different route, sometimes it means turning around.

1

SIGNIFICANT 24 HOUR SNOWFALL

Most human triggered avalanches occur within 24 hours of a snowfall. What is 'significant'? Could be as little as 3" or 4".

2

NATURAL AVALANCHE ACTIVITY

If you see natural activity, it's a sure bet you could also trigger avalanches on similar slopes.

3

WIND

Wind piles snow onto slopes creating dangerous slabs. If you see 'plumes' of snow coming off peaks or ridges, leeward slopes are likely loaded and primed for avalanche.

4

COLLAPSING SNOW OR SHOOTING CRACKS

If you hear a "whumfing" sound when stepping onto a slope or meadow, this is a serious red flag for avalanche hazard. Similarly if you start onto a slope and see a shooting crack propogate from your skis or board, that slope is also primed to slide.

5

RAPID WARMING

Rapid temperature rise can weaken bonds in the snowpack and increase the avalanche hazard. Be especially aware in the spring.

big sky mountain products

619 North Church Unit #3

Bozeman, MT 59715

406-404-1123

info@skiskinsonline.com

Facebook link Youtube link Instagram link

Submitting Form...

The server encountered an error.

Form received.

800

  • 1. SIGNIFICANT 24 HOUR SNOWFALL >>

    Most human triggered avalanches occur within 24 hours of a snowfall. What is 'significant'? Could be as little as 3" or 4".

  • 2. NATURAL AVALANCHE ACTIVITY >>

    If you see natural activity, it's a sure bet you could also trigger avalanches on similar slopes.

  • 3. WIND LOADING >>

    Wind piles snow onto slopes creating dangerous slabs. If you see 'plumes' of snow coming off peaks or ridges, leeward slopes are likely loaded and primed for avalanche.

  • 4. COLLAPSING SNOW / SHOOTING CRACKS >>

    If you hear a "whumfing" sound when stepping onto a slope or meadow, this is a serious red flag for avalanche hazard. Similarly if you start onto a slope and see a shooting crack propogate from your skis or board, that slope is also primed to slide.

  • 5. RAPID WARMING >>

    Rapid temperature rise can weaken bonds in the snowpack and increase the avalanche hazard. Be especially aware in the spring.

Big Sky Mountain Products pineapple logo

backcountry ski and splitboard EQUIPMENT

500